Hummingbird Profiles #2 – Ganbatte 頑張って

Hummingbird Profiles #2
Hummingbird Profiles #2, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

>>:::<<
hummingbird miracles
and determined perseverance
nature’s masterpiece
>>:::<<

I’ve been a resident in my mother’s hospital room at the cancer hospital this past week.  She did well with the surgery and will require several weeks of recuperation, but we are playing the waiting game again with pathology results.  We do our best to persevere.

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Here is the second image in my hummingbird photomanipulation series.  This is a male Black-chinned hummingbird, one of the first hummingbirds that usually arrive at our feeders for the season.  Since purple is one of my favorite colors, I love the glistening purple gorget when the light catches their throat just right.  Hummingbirds symbolize many things, as I’ve posted in the past, two of which are perseverance and overcoming the seemingly impossible.

In my opinion, hummingbirds are one of nature’s many great masterpieces!

The Japanese word for perseverance, to not give up or to “do your best” is:
Ganbatte  頑張って (がんばって)

…and more formal and more polite:
Ganbatte kudasai  頑張ってください

Related articles:

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Hummingbird Profiles #1 – JOY

Hummingbird Profiles #1
Hummingbird Profiles #1, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

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rubies emeralds diamonds
precious gems dazzle in the sky
hummingbird splendor
>>:::<<

First of all, thank you very much for all the kind well wishes for my mother and our family in my recent postings.  I really appreciate and am touched by all your supportive and encouraging words.  Last week was hectic with more tests and procedures, but we are in the “waiting mode” right now – waiting for test results, waiting for surgery, etc., etc.  Cancer is a very wicked thing.

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Last year, I created a few photomanipulations of hummingbird photos I took in our yard.  I intended to post them at the time, but I would develop a brain cramp whenever I tried to create a blog posting using the images…that is, until now.  It could be that now feels like the right time to post these images because hummingbirds symbolize what is needed so much right now:

A common symbolism of the hummingbird is JOY!
(Joy in Japanese is 喜び, which is read yorokobi.)

Tiniest of all birds, the hummingbird is quite spectacular.  It also symbolizes powerful energy, the ability to accomplish the seemingly impossible, and flexibility in life circumstances.  When in the air, their wings are continually in motion, which symbolizes tirelessness and perseverance.

I start off my hummingbird photomanipulation series today with an image of a male Broad-tailed hummingbird.  I find his pose sweet and adorable.  Also, my mother’s top two favorite colors are red and green, similar to the beautiful colors on this bird.

If you are in need of JOY today or at any time, I hope this image will bring you some.

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That Dreadful Word No One Wants to Hear

Vortex
Vortex, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

This post is different from what I normally post.  Over the last several weeks, I’ve felt like I’ve been in a constant spin cycle, increasing in speed and turbulence due to escalating health problems and other issues.  Constant shaking, rapid and forceful heart palpitations, passing out, and intense stomach pains landed me in the emergency room the first week in June, hooked up to several wires and an IV.  Eventually the doctor determined the main issue was “extreme stress.”  Some of these symptoms still continue.

In my last post, I talked about spending several days in the hospital with my Mother because of an unexpected surgery.  That occurred in the middle of June after my own ER visit.  Last week, after recuperating with us, she had what we thought would be a routine follow-up with the doctor, where we would be told she was progressing as expected.  We spent a few minutes talking with the nurse and telling him how my Mom was doing since her surgery.  We had no inkling what was to happen next.  He handed us some papers and said, “I have your pathology results here…there is cancer present…”   What!?!?  The chance of cancer, we were told after surgery, was remote.  But now, that “remote” chance was smacking us right in the face!

We were both shocked.  My Mom’s eyes were welling with tears and her voice was shaking.  I held her hand.  I saw the nurse’s mouth still moving, seemingly in slow motion, but I didn’t hear the next few words.  I was shaking uncontrollably.  My stomach was knotted and churning so violently I thought it was about to explode out of me.  The room was spinning and I felt like we had been yanked right into a vortex.  It is a very rare cancer.  “I’m so sorry to have to give you this news,” he said to us.  The doctor came in next.  We asked him several questions, then he gave us the next steps.  We would be continuing her care with a surgical oncologist.

A few days later (last Friday), we met with this oncologist.  More tests and scans, another surgery, and more cutting and removing to determine the extent of the cancer and further treatments, if necessary.

We are still in shock with this new challenge and we’ll have to take it one step at a time.  Yes, it’s scary, and yes, we have cried.  This is my Mom’s second battle with cancer.  Both cancers are rare and both are unrelated to each other.  This second cancer is even more rare than the first, and because it is so rare, its treatments have not undergone clinical trials.  There is also no known cause.  However, she will receive care at a good cancer hospital just 40 minutes away from our house.  My Mom is strong and healthy for her age, and a truly wonderful, genuine, generous and compassionate person anyone would feel privileged to know.  She has been there for us consistently to help out, provide support, and pull us out of the deepest, darkest holes.

This is not just her battle, it’s our battle, and I will be with my precious mother every step of the way supporting her the best I can.

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Graceful Peony – Woodblock Print

Single Peony - Woodblock
Single Peony – Woodblock, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

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delicate pink chicks
shielded by caressing arms
silken peony

>>:::<<

This image of a single peony is another photomanipulation I did to digitally convert a photo into the likeness of an old Japanese woodblock print.

Single peonies are composed of one or more rows of a few broad petals, known as guard petals, which surround a center of pollen-bearing stamens, which in turn surround the pistil.  I believe the name of this peony is Sea Shell.  I like how delicate and silky the petals are, and how the formation of stamens and pistils looks like a birds nest.

Hope your week is off to a splendid start!

Here is the original photo I started with:

Peony
Peony, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

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My Favorite Daffodil – Woodblock Print

Daffodil Replete Woodblock
Daffodil Replete Woodblock, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

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sipping peach cocktails
dreaming among soft sunsets
daffodil garden
>>:::<<

This is a photomanipulation to digitally convert a photo into the likeness of an old Japanese woodblock print. I last posted one of these styles over a year ago. How time flies!

The image is of a double daffodil variety named Replete, one of my favorite types of daffodils.  They are beautifully shaped blooms that are peach/pink with snow white.  It’s wonderful to be surrounded by these beauties while enjoying a refreshing cocktail!

Hope you are having a wonderful week!

P.S. Here is the photo I started with:

Daffodil Replete
Daffodil Replete, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.
(click on photo to enlarge)

 Linking up with:
MACRO MONDAY
TUESDAY MUSE
NATURE NOTES

Weekly Photo Challenge: Unique

Ladybug Handstand
Ladybug Handstand, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

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have you ever seen
a ladybug in a handstand
dare to be different
>>:::<<

Glad to be participating in the Weekly Photo Challenge after being absent for a couple of months.
Post-processing done in Photoshop Elements 10.  Here is the original photo:

Ladybug Handstand photo

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is to share a photo
that says unique to you.

Linking up with:

PHOTO ART FRIDAY
THIS OR THAT THURSDAY
CAMERA CRITTERS
WEEKLY TOP SHOT

Belated New Year Greeting and Hummingbird Profile

New Year 2013
New Year 2013, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

I’m popping in to wish you all a belated Happy New Year.  (At least it’s still January!)  I haven’t posted for a while, but I’ve really appreciated your visits, comments and well wishes on my blog and by email.  Healing in general is slow, and even slower when there are already existing health issues.

This is my Japanese New Year postcard for 2013.  I have been creating these postcards, called “nengajo” for the last few years, and with my own twist!  (Click here to see my nengajo from last year.)  In Japan, these cards are traditionally delivered on January 1st, but there is no mail delivery in the United States on that day, so my cards arrive after the 1st.

  • Akemashite Omedetou Gozaimasu 明けましておめでとうございます – Happy New Year!
  • Nengajo 年賀状 – Japanese New Year’s card
  • Etegami 絵手紙 – Japanese word meaning picture letter/message, traditionally done in a postcard size meant to be mailed
  • Hachidori  ハチドリ – Hummingbird

This is an image of a female Rufous Hummingbird, which I created from a photo I took last summer.  Hummingbirds have different symbolisms in different countries, but the more common ones I’ve found are the following:

Tiniest of all birds, the hummingbird is quite spectacular.  It is the only bird that can come to a dead stop in mid-air.  It can hover, fly backwards, forwards, up and down.

A common symbolism of the hummingbird is joy.  It also symbolizes powerful energy, the ability to accomplish the seemingly impossible, and flexibility in life circumstances.  They are reminders that life is meant to be savored.  When in the air, their wings are continually in motion, which symbolizes tirelessness and perseverance.  The hummingbird wings move in the pattern of the infinity symbol (figure 8) and are often thought to symbolize eternity and everlasting life.”

 Wishing you a happy new year full of JOY! 

Linking up with:
NATURE NOTES
WILD BIRD WEDNESDAY
BIRD D’POT

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